Introduction

New tech developments show that drone surveillance and the Internet of Things (IoT) are a threat to democracy.

Readers who are not aware of relatively recent tech innovations should google “slaughter bots“. Or else you may be tempted to dismiss it as science fiction when I and many other academics warn against a future when probably millions or even trillions of tiny insect drones will be (undetectably) monitoring cities and all roads in the countryside (during a national emergency).

When new batteries and other energy technologies are able to fuel insect drones, they will be deployed (in an “emergency situation”). Swarms of tiny recon drones, together with IoT sensors in everything you buy, will give Big Tech unprecedented totalitarian power, making it impossible to fight CorpStates after this surveillance system is fully activated.

The above threat is serious enough to justify that left- and rightwing groups temporarily stop fighting each other and instead focus on preventing Big Tech tyranny.

I will not take sides in the conflict between left- and rightwing groups. I will discuss nothing else than the power of Big Tech and which strategies and tactics are best when combatting it.

To be fair and balanced I’ll also present all arguments in favor of Big Tech and welcome criticism from supporters of Amazon and other companies involved in military surveillance capitalism.

To prove that my posts will be fair and evidence-based, as recommended by Hans Rosling in “Factfulness”, I’ll start by presenting a link to arguments (indirectly) in favor of cyber weapons, recon drones and lethal combat bots. Please read this article by NSA published in The New York Times:

I Work for N.S.A. We Cannot Afford to Lose the Digital Revolution

Any corporate trolls wanting to use unfair tactics in our debate, please feel free to do that, because it will just be ignored by readers familiar with books such as 1) “Undercover” by Lewis and Evans, 2) “Trust Me, I’m Lying” by Ryan Holiday, 3) “Disrupt and Deny” by Rory Cormac, and 4) “Messing with the Enemy” by Clint Watts.